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Why a Blood Moon Eclipse Turns Red

he moon turns blood red in this 3:30 a.m. ET perspective of a sum lunar obscure on Apr 15, 2014 as seen by a telescope during a University of Arizona's Mt. Lemmon SkyCenter during Steward Observatory atop Mt. Lemmon, Arizona.


The moon turns blood red in this 3:30 a.m. ET perspective of a sum lunar obscure on Apr 15, 2014 as seen by a telescope during a University of Arizona’s Mt. Lemmon SkyCenter during Steward Observatory atop Mt. Lemmon, Arizona.
Credit: Mt. Lemmon SkyCenter/University of Arizona

On Sunday (Sept. 27), skywatchers opposite a United States will be in for a special treat: The full “supermoon” (a full moon when a moon is closest to Earth in a orbit) will go into eclipse. A lunar obscure occurs when a moon passes into a shade of a Earth.

There are several “flavors” of eclipse. A penumbral obscure happens when a moon only grazes a thinnest prejudiced of Earth’s shadow. If a moon partly goes into a shadow, observers see a prejudiced eclipse. A total eclipse is a many fantastic of a three: The moon goes entirely into a shade and appears possibly red or brown.

Sometimes an obscure moon is called a “blood moon” since of this rusty color. But since does a moon spin red, and not simply dim to black when it goes into a shadow? As NASA explains, it’s since a Earth’s atmosphere extends over a planet, and object passes by it, still reaching a moon. [Supermoon Lunar Eclipse 2015: Full ‘Blood Moon’ Coverage]

“During a sum lunar eclipse, white object attack a atmosphere on a sides of a Earth gets engrossed and afterwards radiated out (scattered). Blue-colored light is many affected,” NASA officials wrote online. “That is, a atmosphere filters out (scatters away) many of a blue-colored light. What’s left over is a orange- and red-colored light.”

The light by Earth’s atmosphere afterwards falls onto a moon. NASA records that a red light seen during a lunar obscure is most dimmer than a standard moon’s light. That happens since a red light is reflected behind to Earth, and it is most dimmer than a white light a object customarily shines onto the moon’s surface.

The moon turns opposite shades of red, orange or bullion with any eclipse. That’s since a shade of a light reaching a moon depends on what is in Earth’s atmosphere (the volume of H2O and particles), as good as a atmosphere’s heat and humidity, NASA wrote. For example, a new volcanic tear could send some-more particulates into a atmosphere, serve extinguishing a moon during an eclipse.

Editor’s Note: If we snap an extraordinary design of a Sept. 27 sum lunar obscure and wish to be featured in a story or gallery, we can send photos, comments, and your name and plcae to handling editor Tariq Malik at spacephotos@space.com.

Follow Elizabeth Howell @howellspace, or Space.com @Spacedotcom. We’re also on Facebook and Google+. Original essay on Space.com.

Article source: http://www.space.com/30659-why-blood-moon-eclipse-is-red.html

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